Category Archives: PUBLISHING

WILLIAM E. JONES’S HALSTED PLAYS HIMSELF by Aliina Astrova

In The Screwball Asses—an essay originally published anonymously in Félix Guattari’s Recherches in 1973 and reprinted by Semiotext(e) in 2006—Guy Hocquenghem criticizes the gay liberation movement for answering “oppression in the terms of oppression,” the repressed group’s search for acceptance consequently resulting in the fall of the Leftist principles and the eventual conformation to the […]

ARE YOU WORKING TOO MUCH? by Eva Kenny

E-flux’s new book, Are You Working Too Much? Post-Fordism, Precarity, and the Labor of Art, is a collection of texts from their online and print journal that have, over the past year, dealt with the subject of art as work and art-related workers in the post-Fordist economy.

R.H. QUAYTMAN’S SPINE by Alaina Claire Feldman

RH Quaytman’s work, in short, has been comprised of paintings since 2001. Silkscreened photographs and optical abstractions on plywood panels poetically interweave formal narrative, art history, the artist’s history and the history of each painting. These elements are organized then as whole “chapters” where individual works are considered within the context of their serial grouping. […]

Becky Beasley: What I’m Reading Now

  I am reading … about color. So:

CARLA LONZI AUTORITRATTO by Alessandra Sandrolini

As Italy celebrates the 150th anniversary of its unification, the country passes through a rather dark moment in which the political economy and the power of the media seem to be in league against the artistic and intellectual resources of the country while contributing to the degradation of the image of women. Thus maybe it […]

CHRIS KRAUS’ WHERE ART BELONGS by Aliina Astrova

Fifteen years have passed since Jean Baudrillard wrote The Conspiracy of Art, shocking his contemporaries with blatant skepticism towards the state of artistic practice. Since then, pessimistic attitudes about the future of art have become prevalent, expounding on the dangers of capitalism through texts released by publishers like Semiotext(e), which reprinted Baudrillard’s essay in 2005. […]

CLIP/STAMP/FOLD by Leah Whitman-Salkin

There seems to be an endless appetite for the rehashing of 1960s and ’70s radicalism. This is especially true as a younger generation of creative producers and thinkers aggressively seek (and repeatedly flounder in their—our—search for) a contemporary parallel zeitgeist. Without fail, this search leads back to the aforementioned decades, ones that seem to be […]